Welcome To Randomania!!!

dreamwurks:

ineffablye:

Like everyone always talks about how amazing Rise of the Guardians’ animation was but I think we need to all take a step back and look at the work of art that TinTin was like

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just

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look

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at

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this

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animation

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like

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wow

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WOW

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look at this detail i cant even

When I first saw a trailer on TV I thought it was live action until I saw it again and I was like “wait is it live action”

let-them-eat-vag:

Fuck me this is the cutest fucking duck video I’ve ever fucking seen in my whole fucking life it’s a huge fucking deal

let-them-eat-vag:

Fuck me this is the cutest fucking duck video I’ve ever fucking seen in my whole fucking life it’s a huge fucking deal

oiruman:

ufoattack:

oiruman:

i am kind of sad ok

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this cat’s name is Princess Monster Truck

thank you

19-2000 (x)

restlesslyaspiring:

the-fault-in-our-wifi:

starkient:

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I’ve been waiting for this

God I love you people.

theonlymissjoker:

prauprganda:

I shouldn’t have laughed

I certainly did.

theonlymissjoker:

prauprganda:

I shouldn’t have laughed

I certainly did.

thecraftychemist:

How Magic Rocks Work

Magic Rocks are chunks of metal salts that have been stabilized by being dispersed in aluminum hydroxide or alum. The ‘magic solution’ is a solution of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) in water. The metal salts react with the sodium silicate to form the characteristic colored precipitant (chemical towers about 4” high).

Grow Your Own crystal garden

Magic rocks are available on the Internet and are quite inexpensive, but you can make them yourself. These are the salts used to make magic rocks. Some of the colorants are readily available; most require access to a general chemistry lab (consult MSDS for each).
White - calcium chloride (found on the laundry aisle of some stores)
White - lead (II) nitrate
Purple - manganese (II) chloride
Blue - copper (II) sulfate (common chemistry lab chemical, also used for aquaria and as an algicide for pools)
Red - cobalt (II) chloride
Pink - manganese (II) chloride
Orange - iron (III) chloride
Yellow - iron (III) chloride
Green - nickel (II) nitrate
Source - Full instructions here

GIF Video Source

thecraftychemist:

How Magic Rocks Work

Magic Rocks are chunks of metal salts that have been stabilized by being dispersed in aluminum hydroxide or alum. The ‘magic solution’ is a solution of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) in water. The metal salts react with the sodium silicate to form the characteristic colored precipitant (chemical towers about 4” high).

Grow Your Own crystal garden

Magic rocks are available on the Internet and are quite inexpensive, but you can make them yourself. These are the salts used to make magic rocks. Some of the colorants are readily available; most require access to a general chemistry lab (consult MSDS for each).

  • White - calcium chloride (found on the laundry aisle of some stores)
  • White - lead (II) nitrate
  • Purple - manganese (II) chloride
  • Blue - copper (II) sulfate (common chemistry lab chemical, also used for aquaria and as an algicide for pools)
  • Red - cobalt (II) chloride
  • Pink - manganese (II) chloride
  • Orange - iron (III) chloride
  • Yellow - iron (III) chloride
  • Green - nickel (II) nitrate

Source - Full instructions here

GIF Video Source